Thursday, July 13, 2017

The 2017 Golden Kite Award For Nonfiction Goes to "We Will Not Be Silent" by Russell Freedman - The Interview

I asked Russell to please share the spark of inspiration that became "We Will Not Be Silent: The White Rose Student Resistance Movement That Defied Adolf Hitler.."

Here's his response: 

Over the years I’ve had the opportunity to write about some of the major historical events of my time. Looking back, I’ve recaptured forgotten memories and, through research, gained a deeper understanding of the forces that have shaped my generation. Along the way, I wanted to add my voice to the massive body of literature about the holocaust without simply repeating what has already been said. I was searching for an approach that would convey a redeeming theme of hope and human decency amidst the ruins of history. My eureka moment–my spark of inspiration—resulted from a chance encounter with an amazing movie. A friend gave me a DVD of Sophie Scholl, a German film nominated in 1985 for an Academy Award as the year’s best foreign language film. A powerful story about youthful courage and idealism, the film introduced me to the White Rose student resistance movement in Nazi Germany—an episode of youthful courage and idealism. This was the story I had been searching for. I immediately began the research that would take me to Munich, Germany, birthplace of both the Nazi party and the anti-Nazi student resistance movement, a city dedicated today to the memory of the fearless young activists who defied Adolf Hitler.

Russell's editor Dinah Stevenson was kind enough to answer some questions as well...

Lee; What made you say “Yes!” to “We Will Not Be Silent”?

Dinah: I always say yes to Russell. Sometimes he proposes a couple of different book ideas and I choose between them. This time he didn’t offer alternative projects, and I immediately agreed that this should be his next project. I shared his vision that this book, with its young protagonists, would be fascinating and inspiring to young readers. Further, I responded to the subject on a personal level, since both Russell and I are Jews.

Lee: Did the book change throughout the process of working with Russell, and if so, how?

Dinah: Not noticeably. Russell’s manuscripts are invariably well thought out and complete, and this one was no exception. I asked him to clarify and provide context for some of the content. There were no substantive changes.

Lee: Do you have thoughts to share on Russell winning the Golden Kite for this book — the book you edited?

Dinah: I’m thrilled to see this book recognized by SCBWI, his fellow writers, and to know that you share my belief in this book. Of course I like it when discerning groups like you and the Sibert Award committee agree with me. But many editors are shy, nocturnal creatures and don’t welcome the spotlight. I’m one of them. I credit Russell’s brilliant writing and thorough professionalism with the success of his work, and I’m delighted that he dedicated this book to me—honoring our long-term author-editor relationship and our close friendship.

Thank you, Dinah!

And thanks and congratulations again to Russell!

Curious to learn more about the Golden Kite Awards? Here's that link.

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